Ref: K042

Moone Abbey

 
Townland: Moone Parish: Moone
 
Denomination: RC Diocese: Dublin (RC) 
 
Grid Ref: 278975(E), 192679(N) Status: Closed
 
Record of Protected Structures (RPS): B36-02 Record of Monuments and Places (RMP): KD036-031010
 
Boundary Treatment: Rough coursed stone wall, 1.5-4m high
 
Natural Heritage Details: 20-25 mature and 1-10 young trees dispersed throughout; full coverage of mown grass except for paths and abbey building; lichens visible on 100% of gravestones; ivy on boundary walls; limited ivy cover on gravestones and ground surface.
 
Description: K042 is located in a rural setting NW of the town of Moone. It is marked on both the 1st edition OS 6" map and the 1897-1913 OS 25" map. It is accessed directly from a local road via an arched wooden gate or a gap in the wall on the west side. A gravel path leads to the north wall of the ruined abbey, which itself partially defines the north of the burial area. The abbey building contains Moone High Cross. The area south of the abbey is the main burial area. There are also grave markers to the east of the abbey. A wall extends SE from the SE corner of the abbey building. Loosely dividing these two burial areas. There is a doorway (with no door) in this wall. The eastern boundary of the graveyard is only defined by a very sharp dropping ground level down to an adjoining farmyard. A gravel path leads around the abbey and the ground surface off the path is even. The grass is short. Legible gravestones date from 18th-20th century.
 
Appraisal: The site is of considerable archaeological, architectural and historic interest, attesting to the long-standing ecclesiastical presence in the area. The ecclesiastical remains are probably 15th century. The belfry at the SE corner fell down in the 19th century. Architectural features of note are the single light splayed windows in the N and S walls and the two lintelled windows in the W gable. There were originally four high crosses one at each cardinal point. Two survive intact, while the bases of the other two survive. The boundaries are in very good condition. Most gravestones are worn down to stumps and are entirely illegible. Most legible, upstanding gravestones are leaning. At least one gravestone in the centre of the southern burial area has been engulfed by vegetation. The ground surface is even.
 
Record Of Inscriptions: Recorded by: Schools Project (1970s)
Location: Co. Kildare online Electronic History Journal

Website Development: Kildare Web Services